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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ron C.
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-27T00:22:22Z
dc.date.available2009-04-27T00:22:22Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationSmith, R. C.(2004). Mercenaries and the law. New Zealand International Review, 29(4), 11-15.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2118
dc.description.abstractThe International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries arose from understandable African concerns about the influence of European mercenaries in the continent during decolonisation in the 1960s and early 1970s. These same concerns also gave rise to a vary adverse treatment of the concept ‘mercenary’ in Protocol 1 (1977) to the Geneva Conventions of 1949. However, these events do not justify, in 2004, further anti-mercenary measures and, particularly, they do not require the ratification of the convention against mercenary activity, about which even the existing small number of parties have considerable doubt. As the British Foreign Secretary said in his foreword to an official green paper on the subject, ‘Today’s world is a far cry from the 1960s when private military activity usually meant mercenaries of the rather unsavoury kind involved in post-colonial and neo-colonial conflicts’.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Institute of International Affairsen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.victoria.ac.nz/nziia/publications/nzir/issues.htmlen
dc.rightsThis is the published version of an article published in the journal: New Zealand International Review. Used with permission.en
dc.subjectmercenaryen
dc.subjectAnti-Mercenary Conventionen
dc.titleMercenaries and the lawen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.relation.isPartOfNew Zealand International Reviewen_NZ
pubs.begin-page11en_NZ
pubs.elements-id29974
pubs.end-page15en_NZ
pubs.issue4en_NZ
pubs.volumeXXIXen_NZ


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