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dc.contributor.authorSoo, Rochelle M.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-14T15:26:24Z
dc.date.available2008-01-10T16:42:31Z
dc.date.issued2007en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationSoo, R. M. (2007). Microbial Biodiversity of Thermophilic Communities in Hot Mineral Soils of Tramway Ridge, Mt. Erebus, Antarctica (Thesis, Master of Science (MSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/2441en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2441
dc.description.abstractOnly a few studies have looked at microbial biogeography in soils and whether microorganisms are endemic to an area is still debatable. Tramway Ridge, a geothermal area on Mount Erebus, Antarctica, provides a unique opportunity due to its isolation and extreme conditions to explore the possibilities of microbial endemism and to identify novel Bacteria and Archaea. This site was chosen for a culture-independent study with a preliminary culturing survey for bacterial communities along three temperature gradients (65 C - 2.5'C). In addition, a physico-chemical analysis was undertaken to identify which environmental factors were driving the different diversity along the transects. An automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to assess the diversity across the transects using Bacteria and Cyanobacteria-specific primers and results showed that temperature and pH were the main drivers for these communities. Due to its unique physico-chemical and ARISA profile, a hot temperature site (T-3A, 65'C) was chosen for further investigation by bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA clone libraries. Unique rDNA types among the 78 bacterial and 83 archaeal clones were identified by restriction fragment length polymophisms and 18 bacterial and 5 archaeal operational taxonomic units (gt97% identity) were observed. All of the bacterial sequences were deeply branching and loosely affiliated with other recognised bacterial divisions, with 40% of the sequences not affiliated to any genus. The archaeal clones were found to be deep-branching and sequences clustered together within the Crenarcaheota. In addition, two strains of Bacilli were isolated. The novel microorganisms show that the Tramway Ridge communities are unique from organisms found in other environments and show that quotEverything is (not) everywherequot.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectTramway Ridgeen_NZ
dc.subjectMt Erebusen_NZ
dc.subjectBacteriaen_NZ
dc.subjectArchaeaen_NZ
dc.subjectPhysico-chemicalen_NZ
dc.subjectculture-independenten_NZ
dc.titleMicrobial Biodiversity of Thermophilic Communities in Hot Mineral Soils of Tramway Ridge, Mt. Erebus, Antarcticaen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineScience and Engineeringen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2007-08-14T15:26:24Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2008-01-10T16:42:31Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20070814.152624en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-09T23:34:15Zen_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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