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dc.contributor.authorDavison, Brad Williamen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-23T11:18:44Z
dc.date.available2007-01-16T12:04:45Z
dc.date.issued2006en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationDavison, B. W. (2006). The Narrative of Flippy Johnson: The Three Act Structure - Criticisms and Alternatives Script and Script Analysis (Thesis, Master of Arts (MA)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/2454en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/2454
dc.description.abstractIn this feature screenplay, I have incorporated the complexities of an intertwining multi-strand narrative, while manipulating the materials of time and space. This has enabled me to begin my exploration into finding a suitable structure in which to tell a story that features a number of characters, all of whom are intended to represent some of human nature's darkest emotions. I have attempted to distinguish my script from the standard three-act structure. However, I do believe it is a fundamental requirement to know all the rules of a classical three-act structure in order to subvert its conventions. The three-act structure has long been a successful model for transmitting a story to the screen. It has provided the basis for many a film where a character triumphs over adversity; where good defeats bad and heroes fall in love. But what about characters that are not heroes? Protagonists who cannot be defined under the even broadest definition of heroism? Can these people thrive within the strict guidelines of a three-act structure, with its strong reliance on a hero's journey? Is there an alternative structure that can deal with these characters, a structure that can incorporate them in a narrative? This MA will attempt to answer these questions, while also investigating if the materials of time and space can be manipulated and understood when working outside the guidelines of a formulaic structure. The materials of time and space are unique to all films and they are both dealt with in different ways by screenwriters and filmmakers alike. Temporal and spatial characteristics have been studied in depth by many critics including, of particular importance to this MA, David Bordwell. Bordwell has used time and space as a way of making sense of narrative and of engaging with a film. This is something that I am attempting to achieve in the following script and commentary. Furthermore, I will try to articulate the manipulation of time and space, with the challenges of multiple strands of narrative and multiple protagonists.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectscreenplayen_NZ
dc.titleThe Narrative of Flippy Johnson: The Three Act Structure - Criticisms and Alternatives Script and Script Analysisen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineScreen and Media Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2006-06-23T11:18:44Zen_NZ
uow.date.available2007-01-16T12:04:45Zen_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/public/adt-uow20060623.111844en_NZ
uow.date.migrated2009-06-09T23:31:38Zen_NZ
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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