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dc.contributor.advisorFoster, T. Mary
dc.contributor.authorHuxtable, Jenny Marieen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-10T21:39:01Z
dc.date.available2010-08-10T21:39:01Z
dc.date.issued2010en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHuxtable, J. M. (2010). An Evaluation of a Self-directed Parent Training Programme. (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/4300en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4300
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of a self-directed parent training programme for preschoolers externalising behaviour problems on child and parenting behaviours. The programme used was the Triple P self-help book and DVD. A non-concurrent multiple baseline design across five participants was used to examine changes in preschoolers externalising and prosocial behaviours over time and parents use of behaviour management strategies was also monitored at baseline and throughout using the self-help programme. A pre-post design was used to further test changes in preschoolers externalising behaviours and parents use of ineffective discipline, and to examine changes in parenting knowledge, competence, and depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. Significant and large effect sizes were found for increased prosocial behaviour, decreased externalising behaviour as shown by the multiple baseline data and parents' decreased ineffective discipline and increased parental competence as shown by the test battery. The pre- and post-measures showed non-significant improvements for parenting knowledge and depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. These findings are comparable to previous research. Parents were satisfied with the intervention, although some participants did not trial all of the strategies taught. This study supports the effectiveness of the self-directed Triple P intervention, without therapist assistance, and suggests that the preschool period may be a particularly important point in preventing the otherwise adverse developmental pathway of externalising behaviour problems. These results require further replication due to the small sample size in the study and the lack of a control group for the pre- post-comparisons. Future parent training research should examine changes in children's prosocial behaviours and parenting knowledge and monitor parents' use of and satisfaction with behaviour management strategies. This would be beneficial in clarifying the nature of these changes and relationship among these variables and to improve parent training programmes to maximise treatment gains.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectself-helpen_NZ
dc.subjectparent trainingen_NZ
dc.subjectexternalising behavioursen_NZ
dc.subjectTriple Pen_NZ
dc.subjectpreschooleren_NZ
dc.subjectmultiple baselineen_NZ
dc.titleAn Evaluation of a Self-directed Parent Training Programme.en_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Sciences (MSocSc)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2010-01-29en_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/uploads/adt-uow20100129.093811
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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