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dc.contributor.advisorWhiu, Leah
dc.contributor.authorCook, Michelle Lynnen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-22T23:30:31Z
dc.date.available2010-08-22T23:30:31Z
dc.date.issued2010en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationCook, M. L. (2010). Restoring Indigneous Law and Justice Traditions (Thesis, Master of Arts (MA)). The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/4385en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/4385
dc.description.abstractRestoring indigenous people's law and their ability to practice their justice traditions is a fundamental aspect of non-discrimination, decolonization, self-governance, self-determination, and social justice. The critical application and interpretation of indigenous people's law has revolutionary potentiality to transform, confront, and heal multiple forms of oppression such as environmental destruction, patriarchy, and the prison/criminal justice system. The sovereign jurisgenerative (law making) power of indigenous peoples is a site of profound hope for the revitalization of indigenous law and justice traditions restores legal principles and values of sacredness, harmony, balance, and interconnectivity within human relationships and with the natural world. Revitalizing indigenous law is a way to re-construct the self and society while also finding and re-connecting to new/old ways of being human. This thesis focuses on both Navajo and Māori practices and visions of law and justice; the challenges and, successes they have faced and the hopes they have of living by their law. Indigenous peoples, their ways of being, their wisdom, laws, and philosophies, must be respected, protected, and preserved not only because they contribute to humanity's richness and cultural diversity but also because they are living examples of a more just, dignified, and ecologically sustainable society, which can serve all humanity.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectIndigenous peoplesen_NZ
dc.subjectcustomary lawen_NZ
dc.subjectjustice traditionsen_NZ
dc.subjectgenderen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori tikangaen_NZ
dc.subjectNavajoen_NZ
dc.titleRestoring Indigneous Law and Justice Traditionsen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool of Maori and Pacific Developmenten_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikatoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_NZ
uow.date.accession2010-03-19en_NZ
uow.identifier.adthttp://adt.waikato.ac.nz/uploads/adt-uow20100319.140339
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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