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dc.contributor.advisorFerrier-Kerr, Jenny L.
dc.contributor.authorBosamata, James
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-01T21:05:53Z
dc.date.available2011-06-01T21:05:53Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationBosamata, J. (2011). Induction Experiences of Beginning Secondary Teachers in Solomon Islands (Thesis, Master of Educational Leadership (MEdLeadership)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/5377en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5377
dc.description.abstractResearch shows teacher induction programmes are crucial in supporting new teachers as they move into the profession. Widely implemented in different ways in many countries they have a shared purpose, which is to provide beginning teachers with an effective and supported transition into the teaching profession. In Solomon Islands, beginning teacher induction is yet to be made formal, standardised and systematic. This study investigated the induction experiences of beginning secondary teachers in Solomon Islands. While there is considerable research on beginning teacher induction in other countries, especially the developed countries, very little research has been carried out in Melanesian countries such as Solomon Islands. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews. Five themes emerged as central to beginning secondary teacher induction in Solomon Islands: barriers to effective beginning teacher induction; lack of formal beginning teacher induction; mentoring as an induction approach; need for professional development; and the influence of school leadership. Beginning secondary teachers in Solomon Islands encounter significant problems and challenges during their first years of teaching and for many they become barriers to success. The absence of any kind of formal induction programme for beginning secondary teachers in Solomon Islands appears to be a major contributor to the creation of these barriers. However, there was evidence of mentoring being used as an informal induction approach along with varying degrees of professional guidance and support by some school leaders. The positive influence of school leadership support was identified as a further critical factor in the induction of beginning secondary teachers. The development of an effective induction programme has important implications for beginning teachers in Solomon Islands and those involved in their professional learning. It is recommended that Solomon Islands aim to develop a national beginning teacher induction programme with a strong commitment to ongoing professional development for all stakeholders and an emphasis on professional mentoring as an induction approach.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectinduction
dc.subjectbeginning teachers
dc.subjectSolomon Islands
dc.subjectsecondary teachers
dc.subjectmelanesia
dc.subjectmentoring
dc.subjectprofessional development
dc.subjecteducational leadership
dc.titleInduction Experiences of Beginning Secondary Teachers in Solomon Islandsen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Educational Leadership (MEdLeadership)
dc.date.updated2011-03-18T02:39:20Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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