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dc.contributor.authorCupit, Geoffrey
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-23T23:24:43Z
dc.date.available2011-06-23T23:24:43Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.citationCupit, G. (2000). The basis of equality. Philosophy, 75(291), 105-125.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5418
dc.description.abstractIt is often said that justice requires equality. Which kind of equality justice requires is, of course, a matter of dispute: it is widely held that in a just society there must be equality before the law, and equality of opportunity; many have claimed that justice requires equality of concern for the welfare of each person; and some have argued that significant inequalities in the allocation of resources must be avoided. And, of course, many believe that justice requires public affairs to be conducted through democratic institutions-for only such arrangements express an equality of political status, and seek to provide an equality of influence.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESSen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.royalinstitutephilosophy.org/en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Philosophy. ©2000 Royal Institute of Philosophy. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectequalityen_NZ
dc.titleThe basis of equalityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0031819100000085en_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfPhilosophyen_NZ
pubs.begin-page105en_NZ
pubs.elements-id41326
pubs.end-page125en_NZ
pubs.issue291en_NZ
pubs.volume75en_NZ


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