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dc.contributor.advisorCable, Donald Alfred James
dc.contributor.advisorO’Driscoll, Michael P.
dc.contributor.authorMeikle, Sarah Marie
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-19T01:43:21Z
dc.date.available2011-09-19T01:43:21Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationMeikle, S. M. (2011). The Physical Work Environment in relation to the Physical and Psychological Symptoms of Sick Building Syndrome (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/5757en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/5757
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the relationship between perceptions of a poor physical work environment (PWE) and sick building syndrome (SBS), and with various psychological variables that impact organizational productivity. 164 employees working in medium to large office buildings in New Zealand completed an online questionnaire. Overall, the results supported the relationships that were predicted. Ratings of a poor PWE were strongly and positively related to SBS symptoms. Both ratings of a poor PWE and SBS symptoms were positively related to absenteeism, turnover intentions, and continuance commitment; and were negatively related to affective commitment, perceived organizational support, and job satisfaction. SBS mediated the relationship between PWE and most of these variables, except for continuance commitment. Contrary to prior research self-rated job performance was not found to be related to PWE or SBS. The major implications of this research are that it is important for researchers and managers alike to consider the physical aspects of the work environment as well as managerial and interpersonal aspects. This research also showed that New Zealand employees are experiencing SBS symptoms, indicating SBS is just as important for New Zealand organizations as it is for organizations overseas. Further implications of this study, and directions for future research are discussed in the final chapter.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectSick Building Syndrome
dc.subjectPhysical Work Environment
dc.subjectabsenteeism
dc.subjectturnover intentions
dc.subjectorganisational commitment
dc.subjectjob satisfaction
dc.subjectjob performance
dc.subjectperceived organisational support
dc.titleThe Physical Work Environment in relation to the Physical and Psychological Symptoms of Sick Building Syndromeen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2011-03-18T01:49:22Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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