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dc.contributor.authorRumbles, Wayne
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T04:10:10Z
dc.date.available2012-12-13T04:10:10Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationRumbles, W. (2011) Spectre of jurisdiction: Supreme court of New South Wales and the British subject in Aotearoa/New Zealand 1823-41. Law Text Culture. 15, 209-232.en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1322-9060
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/6947
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on the period prior to the Treaty of Waitangi when the Supreme Court of New South Wales had jurisdiction over British subjects living in the ‘Islands of New Zealand’. It is acknowledged that there were many factors driving the colonial endeavour in New Zealand. However it was in this period that the raw materials of the colonial state were formed: namely, a people who became an imagined community, with an emerging sense of society or culture, occupying a bounded and mapped territory. One, perhaps unlikely, catalyst for this process was the unstable, partial and largely ineffectual jurisdiction of the New South Wales Supreme Court.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wollongongen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Law Text Culture. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.titleSpectre of jurisdiction: Supreme court of New South Wales and the British subject in Aotearoa/New Zealand 1823-41en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfLaw Text Cultureen_NZ
pubs.begin-page209en_NZ
pubs.elements-id36910
pubs.end-page232en_NZ
pubs.volume15en_NZ


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