Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.advisorBizo, Lewis A.
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwan, James S.A.
dc.contributor.authorStaples, Krystal Nell
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-13T23:06:36Z
dc.date.available2013-01-13T23:06:36Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationStaples, K. N. (2012). The Role of Differential outcomes on Gambling Behaviour (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/7044en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7044
dc.description.abstractThis research is based on the conduction of a series of experiments that systematically occurred based on participants performance on a gambling simulation. In Experiment 1, a Roulette simulation allowed the manipulation of the probability that a win would occur after a bet on red or black. First year psychology students (N=18) participated for extra course credit and were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions (Group 1a started with $100 credit, experienced 70% probability of a win on red and 10% probability of a win on black with red and black results being drawn evenly; Group 2a experienced the same conditions as Group 1a except for a higher starting credit of $500; Group 1c started with $500 credit, experienced 100% probability of a win on red and a 0% probability of a win on black with red and black numbers being drawn equally). Results showed that the majority of participants did not match betting behaviour to reinforcement outcomes. In Experiment 2 the simulation was simplified. Group 2a experienced 70% probability of a win on red and 10% probability of a win on black with both red and black numbers being drawn equally; Group 2b experienced 100% probability of a win on red and 0% probability on black with 90% of numbers drawn by the computer being red and 10% black; Group 2c had 75% probability of winning on red and 25% probability of a win on black with 75% of results drawn being red and 25% being black. Results show that participants gambling behaviour was roughly proportional to the amount of reinforcement received on each colour, demonstrating reinforcer control over participant‟s behaviour, so called matching. These differing results are then discussed in relation to the possible implications for future research.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectGambling
dc.subjectBehaviour
dc.titleThe Role of Differential outcomes on Gambling Behaviouren
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2012-04-22T21:24:18Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record