Show simple item record  

dc.contributor.advisorLim, Steven
dc.contributor.advisorCameron, Michael Patrick
dc.contributor.authorTran, Quang Tuyen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-13T23:16:01Z
dc.date.available2013-06-13T23:16:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationTran, Q. T. (2013). Farmland Acquisition and Household Livelihoods in Hanoi’s Peri-Urban Areas (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/7714en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7714
dc.description.abstractWhile farmland loss (due to urbanisation and industrialisation) causes job losses for a huge number of farmers and threatens food security, it can bring about a wide range of new job opportunities for local people through which they can change their livelihoods and improve their welfare. The literature in Vietnam and some other countries reveals that although there has been much discussion about the mixed impacts of farmland loss on rural household livelihoods, none of these impacts has been quantified thus far. This thesis is the first study to use econometric methods for quantifying the various impacts of farmland loss on households' livelihood strategies and outcomes. Using survey data from 477 randomly sampled households in 6 communes in a peri-urban district of Hanoi, several regression models were used to examine how and to what extent farmland loss has affected rural household livelihoods in Vietnam. Specifically, three key relationships were considered and tested: (i) the relationship between farmland loss and household livelihood strategies; (ii) the relationship between farmland loss and household livelihood outcomes (income and consumption expenditure); and (iii) the relationship between farmland loss and household income shares by source. It was found that farmland loss has a positive impact on the choice of non-farm work-based strategies, notably the informal wage work-based strategy. Given the impact of farmland loss, households' income shares actually diversified into non-farm sources, especially informal wage income. Interestingly, the results indicate that farmland loss, coupled with compensation, has no negative impact on livelihood outcomes (neither income nor consumption expenditure per capita). Possibly this can be explained by the fact that a number of households used part of their compensation money for smoothing consumption. In addition, income earned from jobs outside of farming might compensate for or even exceed the loss of farm income due to the loss of farmland. This suggests that farmland loss can have an indirect positive effect on livelihood outcomes (through its positive effect on non-farm participation). This thesis makes several key contributions. Firstly, with a combination of an adapted analytical framework and appropriate econometric models, this study provides a proper approach for studies of the relationship between farmland loss and rural household livelihoods. Secondly, it provides the first econometric evidence for the links between farmland loss and household livelihood strategies and outcomes. Finally, based on the empirical results, this study proposes valuable policy recommendations for mitigating negative impacts of farmland loss on rural households and helping them achieve better livelihood outcomes.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectFarmland acquisition, household livelihoods, Hanoi's peri-urban areas
dc.subjectfarmland loss, informal wage work, formal wage work
dc.titleFarmland Acquisition and Household Livelihoods in Hanoi's Peri-Urban Areas
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.updated2013-06-01T02:25:55Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record