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dc.contributor.authorKingsbury, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-02T02:19:12Z
dc.date.available2013-08-02T02:19:12Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationKingsbury, A. (2010). International harmonisation of designs law: the case for diversity. European Intellectual Property Review, 32(8), 382-395.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/7814
dc.description.abstractIndustrial design is a hybrid, it lies at the intersection of art and utility. Design refers to aspects of pure and high art, and design is also a feature of the most utilitarian of objects. Design is therefore an essential component of aspects of art and craft, and also of a wide range of consumer and industrial products. In design policy, there is a continuing tension between the desire to protect and promote competition in the commercial arena, and the desire to promote art, creativity and culture.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherThomson Reutersen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sweetandmaxwell.co.uk/Catalogue/ProductDetails.aspx?productid=7061&recordid=460en_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: European Intellectual Property Review. © 2010 Thomson Reuters Legal Limited and the author. Used with permission.en_NZ
dc.subjectharmonisationen_NZ
dc.subjectlawen_NZ
dc.subjectdesign lawen_NZ
dc.titleInternational harmonisation of designs law: the case for diversityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.relation.isPartOfEuropean Intellectual Property Reviewen_NZ
pubs.begin-page382en_NZ
pubs.elements-id35286
pubs.end-page395en_NZ
pubs.issue8en_NZ
pubs.volume32en_NZ


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