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dc.contributor.authorCowley, Natalie Anne
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Mark
dc.contributor.authorParkinson, Helen
dc.contributor.authorSwain, David
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-23T03:58:33Z
dc.date.available2008-05-23T03:58:33Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationCowley, N., Nicholls, M., Parkinson, H. & Swain, D. (2004). Preventing child pedestrian injuries and deaths arising from vehicle-child accidents in domestic driveways: An action research project. 2004-2005 Summer Research Scholarship report for the Child Accident Prevention Foundation New Zealand (CAPFNZ). Hamilton, New Zealand: Department of Societies and Cultures, University of Waikato.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/796
dc.description.abstractThis research was a three-fold investigation into the viability of previous recommendations for vehicle-related child driveway accident safety . Firstly, the groups most at risk of these types of accidents were determined in order that they could be specifically considered when reviewing the practicalities of previous recommendations . Secondly, the feasibility of previous recommendations was systematically examined through both an extensive literature review and key and expert informant interviews . Based on these, the likelihood of implementation of previous safety recommendations for the identified high risk groups was ascertained, providing a basis on which to abandon some previous recommendations, remove obstacles to others which would enhance practicability and generate further recommendations that would be tenable for the at-risk groups in particular. The key findings of this research were, foremost, that there is a noticeable lack of specific reference to vehicle-related child driveway accidents in any legislation or safety guidelines, as well as a shortage of official data that deal expressly with this type of accident. Further, it was found that the major obstacles to the implementation of previous recommendations - particularly the environmental ones - were cost, autonomy, and spatial constraints. While several recommendations were abandoned due to factors such as unproven or dubious effectiveness and/or prohibitive cost, it was found that the most viable recommendations were characterised by their relatively low cost for the families involved. These recommendations were typically environmental or educational in nature. Thus, the recommendations in this report include some moderate regulatory changes to facilitate greater uptake of environmental and behaviour-modifying recommendations as well as practical ideas that all need to be part of a cohesive campaign to address the issue of vehicle-related child driveway accidents in New Zealand.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherDepartment of Societies and Cultures, University of Waikato
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCAPFNZ Report
dc.subjectchild safetyen_US
dc.subjectaccidentsen_US
dc.subjectvehicle safetyen_US
dc.subjectdrivewaysen_US
dc.subjectCAPFNZen_US
dc.titlePreventing child pedestrian injuries and deaths arising from vehicle-child accidents in domestic driveways: An action research projecten_US
dc.typeCommissioned Report for External Bodyen_US
pubs.elements-id52970
pubs.place-of-publicationHamiltonen_NZ


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