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dc.contributor.advisorBizo, Lewis A.
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwan, James S.A.
dc.contributor.authorHay, Louise
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-01T02:35:18Z
dc.date.available2014-08-01T02:35:18Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationHay, L. (2014). Temporal Stimulus Generalization in Humans (Thesis, Master of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/8704en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8704
dc.description.abstractTwo experiments investigated temporal generalization in humans using a computer based task which presented red dots with a range of lines at different angles and durations. After training with a standard S+ stimulus duration, generalization testing commenced with an asymmetrical series of presentations of lines of varying angles and durations. Experiment 1 had four conditions, with a standard S+ duration being the presentation of a red dot for a fixed duration. Two of the conditions had the addition of the line tilt. In Experiment 1, 11 participants produced a peak shift effect in all four conditions. Experiment 2 was the same as Experiment 1 except that there were two conditions. Condition 2 was the same as Condition 1 except that the participants were given a verbal instruction to think of the line tilt as if hands on a clock. All 9 participants produced a peak shift effect in both conditions. In Experiment 2, the effect of categorising the stimuli and in turn changing the stimuli from a continuous dimension to discrete stimuli (one in which could be labelled) and the verbal instruction of to think of the line tilt as if hands on a clock did not have an effect on the peak shift as predicted. The results for both experiments were in accordance with predictions of adaptation level theory.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectTemporal
dc.subjectGeneralization
dc.titleTemporal Stimulus Generalization in Humans
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Psychology (MAppPsy)
dc.date.updated2014-02-17T00:25:40Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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