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dc.contributor.advisorWaitoki, Waikaremoana
dc.contributor.advisorNikora, Linda Waimarie
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Parewahaika Erenora Te Korowhiti
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-12T04:44:33Z
dc.date.available2014-08-12T04:44:33Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationHarris, P. E. T. K. (2014). Wāhine Whaiora: Māori Women’s Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery (Thesis, Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc)). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/8782
dc.description.abstractThis research examines the unique, lived experiences of wāhine Māori (Māori women) who have been diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder and who are currently living ‘well’. Recent literature indicates that Māori present at higher rates than non-Māori with bipolar disorder. However, there is little qualitative information about the nature of their experiences, as well as sparse detail of the impacts that bipolar has on their everyday living. The purpose of this research is to highlight Māori women’s experiences of bipolar disorder from initial presentation and assessment through to diagnosis, treatment and recovery. It focuses on the impact bipolar disorder has on women’s relationships with their tamariki (children), whānau (family), and partners, while also exploring social and personal impacts, help-seeking patterns, and stories of recovery. This research heard the stories of 11 wāhine Māori using a narrative-storying technique to allow wāhine to share their unique experiences as they recalled them. A thematic analysis was then used to identify key themes that depicted their journeys of: • Illness and symptom presentation; • Consequences and impacts of bipolar disorder; • Support and help-seeking; and • Wellness and recovery. The intent of this research is to create an awareness of the nature of bipolar disorder as it affects wāhine Māori. It endeavours to expose the experiences they have encountered and their aspirations to be better supported by whānau, and community organisations in their attempts to live active and well lives.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Waikato
dc.rightsAll items in Research Commons are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectMāori health
dc.subjectmental health
dc.subjectbipolar disorder
dc.subjectlived experiences
dc.subjectrecovery
dc.subjectMāori women
dc.subjectmental illness
dc.subjectwhānau support
dc.subjectMāori mental health
dc.subjectpsychology
dc.subjectindigenous psychology
dc.subjectwellbeing
dc.subjectindigenous mental health
dc.subjectbarriers to wellness
dc.subjectwhānau ora
dc.subjectkaupapa Māori
dc.subjectabuse
dc.subjecthelp seeking
dc.subjectsupport
dc.subjectunmet needs
dc.subjectwhānau connection
dc.subjectwhānau
dc.subjectparental mental illness
dc.subjectNew Zealand mental health
dc.subjectnarrative inquiry
dc.subjectwhaiora
dc.subjectimpact on family
dc.subjectfamily support
dc.subjectqualitative research
dc.subjectwellness
dc.subjectwellbeing
dc.subjectwomen with mental illness
dc.subjectwomen with bipolar disorder
dc.subjectindigenous wellbeing
dc.subjectMāori with bipolar disorder
dc.subjectwāhine Māori
dc.titleWāhine Whaiora: Māori Women's Experiences of Bipolar Disorder and their Pathways to Recovery
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Waikato
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Sciences (MSocSc)
dc.date.updated2014-05-07T22:56:13Z
pubs.place-of-publicationHamilton, New Zealanden_NZ


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