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dc.contributor.authorBigdeli, Sadeq Z.en_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-02T21:50:04Z
dc.date.available2011en_NZ
dc.date.available2015-09-02T21:50:04Z
dc.date.issued2011en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBigdeli, S. Z. (2011). Legal positivism in the pre-constitutional era of late nineteenth-century Iran. Waikato Law Review, 19(2), 174–187.en
dc.identifier.issn1172-9597en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10289/9589
dc.description.abstractThe Iranian constitutional movement (1906–1911) occurred at a time when revolution was in the air in a number of peripheral nations. In that period of the early twentieth century, a series of uprisings occurred in the third world countries including the Indian nationalist movement of 1905– 1908 against the British, the Maji Maji uprising in Tanganyika in 1905–1907 against German rule, the Bambata (Zulu) Rebellion of 1906 in South Africa against the British, the Young Turks Revolution of 1908, the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and the Chinese Revolution of 1911–1912. While the essence of the Indian and African movements was anti-colonial, pro-democracy ideas were dominant in the latter three (Ottoman Empire, Mexico and China) alongside the Russian (1905), Iranian (1906) and the Portuguese (1910) movements/revolutions. A satirical Iranian journal (Journal of Despotism) at the time remarkably referred to these democratic movements around the world as “siblings”.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Waikatoen_NZ
dc.rightsThis article has been published in the journal: Waikato Law Review. Used with permission.
dc.titleLegal positivism in the pre-constitutional era of late nineteenth-century Iranen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.relation.isPartOfWaikato Law Reviewen_NZ
pubs.begin-page174
pubs.elements-id37232
pubs.end-page187
pubs.issue2en_NZ
pubs.volume19en_NZ


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